George R. R. Martin

Ursula K. Le Guin

Orson Scott Card

Robin Hobb

Anne McCaffrey

Terry Brooks

Kevin J. Anderson

Tad Williams

Robert J. Sawyer

Sean Williams

Jo Walton

David Levine



The London Times

amazon.com

San Francisco Chronicle

Strange Horizons

B & N

Onion AV Club

Locus

Library Journal

Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature Network



Fantasy Literature

Fantasy Book Spot

Novelish

Adventures Underground

FLAMES RISING

THE GREEN MAN REVIEW

SFFWORLD

DRAGONPAGE

DeepGenre

Nethspace



Publications:
"I was reminded of Ursula LeGuin, George R. R. Martin, and J. R. R. Tolkien, but never felt that Rothfuss was imitating anyone. Like the writers he clearly admires, heís an old-fashioned storyteller working with traditional elements, but his voice is his own. I havenít been so gripped by a new fantasy series in years. Itís certain to become a classic."
-The London Times



"Harry Potter fans craving a new mind-blowing series should look no further than THE NAME OF THE WIND--the first book in a trilogy about an orphan boy who becomes a legend. Full of music, magic, love, and loss, Patrick Rothfuss's vivid and engaging debut fantasy knocked our socks off."
-amazon.com



"No ordinary fantasy full of pointless quests and overblown drama. Rather, it is a finely tuned coming-of-age story, full of humor, action and the occasional dose of magic."
-San Francisco Chronicle
Click here for full review



"The debut novel from Patrick Rothfuss -- the first installment of an epic fantasy trilogy entitled the 'Kingkiller Chronicle' -- not only lives up to its extraordinary pre-press hype (DAW president Elizabeth Wollheim called it "the most brilliant first fantasy novel I have read in over 30 years as an editor"), it surpasses it. When fantasy fans begin reading THE NAME OF THE WIND, they should be fully prepared to lose all contact with the outside world while immersed in this highly original and mesmerizing tale of magic, love, and adventure."
-Strange Horizons
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"THE NAME OF THE WIND is a tale filled with wit, humor, and danger, and if it sometimes lacks the complexity epic-addicts have been trained to expect from Martin, the loss is trifling. This is a refreshingly different epic, the mostly first-person narration creating a sense of intimacy and comfort, reminding us that you don't necessarily have to dig down into the raw neurosis of a character (or an entire cast) in order to find yourself deeply moved. [...] Rothfuss himself, with his poetic prose and deeply empathetic vision of a world out of time, [earns] a legitimate comparison to Tolkien."
-B & N
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"THE NAME OF THE WIND is quite simply the best fantasy novel of the past 10 years, although attaching a genre qualification threatens to damn it with faint praise. Say instead that THE NAME OF THE WIND is one of the best stories told in any medium in a decade. Author Patrick Rothfuss teaches English at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, and he describes himself in self-deprecating terms as a perpetual student, role-playing geek, and connoisseur of rejection letters. That's all about to change. His debut novel combines the intricate stories-within-stories structure of The Arabian Nights with the academic setting of the Harry Potter series, and transforms it all into a brooding, thoroughly adult meditation on how heroism went wrong. More entries in the series, dubbed 'The Kingkiller Chronicle,' are promised; they can't appear fast enough."
-Onion AV Club
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"Writers like George R.R. Martin and Gene Wolfe are old hands at revitalizing old tropes, giving fantasy the depth and humanity of the great literary novels, but Rothfuss sets out to retell what should be the most familiar tale of all, in the most familiar mode (the triple-decker). Remarkably, he does make it fresh again in this opening book, complete with an interesting take on magic that adds both emotional impact and intellectual excitement. So bring on volume two!"
-Locus
Click here for full review



"From his childhood as a member of a close-knit family of the nomadic Edema Ruh to his first heady days as a student of magic at a prestigious university, humble bartender Kvothe relates the tale of how a boy beset by fate became a hero, a bard, a magician, and a legend. Rothfuss's first novel launches a trilogy relating not only the history of humankind but also the tale of a world threatened by an evil whose existence it desperately denies. The author explores the development of a person's character while examining the relationship between a legend and its reality and the truth that lies at the heart of stories. Elegantly told and layered with images of tales to come, this richly detailed 'autobiography' of a hero is highly recommended for libraries of any size."
-LIBRARY JOURNAL (Starred Review)



The originality of Rothfuss's outstanding debut fantasy, the first of a trilogy, lies less in its unnamed imaginary world than in its precise execution. Kvothe ("pronounced nearly the same as 'Quothe' "), the hero and villain of a thousand tales who's presumed dead, lives as the simple proprietor of the Waystone Inn under an assumed name. Prompted by a biographer called Chronicler who realizes his true identity, Kvothe starts to tell his life story. >From his upbringing as an actor in his family's traveling troupe of magicians, jugglers and jesters, the Edema Ruh, to feral child on the streets of the vast port city of Tarbean, then his education at "the University," Kvothe is driven by twin imperatives-his desire to learn the higher magic of naming and his need to discover as much as possible about the Chandrian, the demons of legend who murdered his family. As absorbing on a second reading as it is on the first, this is the type of assured, rich first novel most writers can only dream of producing. The fantasy world has a new star.
-PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (Starred Review)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.



"...an engrossing story, well-written, with a richly developed world. It's been a long time since I've read an original fantasy novel that kept me turning the pages as this one did."
- Vicki Palmquist, Children's Literature Network



Author Quotes:
“[THE WISE MAN’S FEAR] was worth the wait. I gulped it down in a day, staying up almost to dawn reading, and I am already itching for the next one. He's bloody good, this Rothfuss guy.”
-George R. R. Martin,
author of A GAME OF THRONES



ďIt is a rare and great pleasure to come on somebody writing the way (Patrick Rothfuss does), not only with the kind of accuracy of language that seems to me absolutely essential to fantasy-making, but with real music in the words as well.... Oh, joy!Ē
-Ursula K. Le Guin,
Bestselling author of THE WIZARD OF EARTHSEA



"Folks, this is the real thing. Though it's considerably darker than the HARRY POTTER series, this is also a bildungsroman -- the story of the childhood, education, and training of a boy who grew up to be a legendary hero. Not a word of the nearly-700-page book is wasted. Rothfuss does not pad. He's the great new fantasy writer we've been waiting for, and this is an astonishing book. I don't recommend it for pre-teens, mostly because it moves at an adult-fiction pace and has some truly disturbing events. But he does not describe gore (though the action is intense) and while there is some sexual tension, nothing is shown that would shock a teenager. If you're a reader of fantasy or simply someone who appreciates a truly epic-scale work of fiction, don't go through this summer without having read it. At the very least it will keep you busy till the last HARRY POTTER comes out. But I warn you -- after THE NAME OF THE WIND, the HARRY POTTER novel might seem a little thin and -- dare I say it? -- childish. You have been warned."
-Orson Scott Card



"It seems to me that every year there are more books I want to read and less time for me to read them. Because my time is limited, I'm guilty of picking up the books by my favorite authors first, and fitting in new authors only when it's convenient.

"Due to a stroke of luck, I've had an advance copy of THE NAME OF THE WIND by my bedside for over six months, just waiting for me to open it. Unfortunately, deadlines of my own kept getting in the way. But in a way, it's lucky that I didn't crack this book until just a few days ago. If I'd had this tale to distract me, I'd have been even later getting my work done.

"I loathe spoilers, so I'm not going to discuss the plot of this book. I will say it has all the things that I demand of a book. The characters are real, the action is convincing and it has a compelling story to tell.

"One of the things I like best about this book is that the magic is absolutely rooted in the book's world. Nothing seems contrived; the consistency is excellent.

"The characters are very well realized. That means that when the protagonist does something clever, it's believable. And when he does something youthfully dumb, it rings just as authentically true. Because the characters are real and the magic is true to its own world, I closed this book feeling as if I'd been on a journey with an entertaining new friend, rather than sitting alone looking at words on a page.

"This one is well worth some of your precious reading time. I'll wager that the books to follow it will also be."
-Robin Hobb



"This is a magnificent book, a really fine story, highly readable and engrossing. I compliment young Pat. His first novel is a great one. Wow!"
-Anne McCaffrey



"THE NAME OF THE WIND marks the debut of a writer we would all do well to watch. Patrick Rothfuss has real talent, and his tale of Kvothe is deep and intricate and wondrous."
-Terry Brooks,
22-time New York Times bestselling author



"Patrick Rothfuss gives us a fabulous debut, standing firmly on the main stage of the fantasy genre and needing no warm-up act. Jordan and Goodkind must be looking nervously over their shoulders!"
-Kevin J. Anderson,
New York Times bestselling coauthor of HUNTERS OF DUNE



"THE NAME OF THE WIND has everything fantasy readers like, magic and mysteries and ancient evil, but it's also humorous and terrifying and completely believable. As with all the very best books in our field, it's not the fantasy trappings (wonderful as they are) that make this novel so good, but what the author has to say about true, common things, about ambition and failure, art, love, and loss."
-Tad Williams,
New York Times bestselling author of MEMORY, SORROW AND THORN, OTHERLAND, and SHADOWMARCH



"Hail Patrick Rothfuss! A new giant is striding the land. THE NAME OF THE WIND is an astonishing novel that just happens to be the writer's first. The bestsellers' lists and the award ballots are beckoning toward Rothfuss, and readers will be clamoring for more of the riveting life story of Kvothe. Bravo, I say! Bravo!"
-Robert J. Sawyer,
Hugo Award-winning author of ROLLBACK



"THE NAME OF THE WIND is a rare find these days, fit for lovers of fantasy and newcomers to the genre alike. It fires the imagination and stirs the heart. In Pat Rothfuss's sure hands, the reader will experience a journey to the very heights of fantasy. I for one never wanted to come back down."
-Sean Williams,
New York Times bestselling author of THE BLOOD DEBT



"This is an exciting and intelligent fantasy debut. Rothfuss clearly knows exactly what he's doing. Once I was started reading, I didn't want to put THE NAME OF THE WIND down, and when I did I kept thinking about the world and the characters and worrying about what was going to happen to them."
-Jo Walton,
World Fantasy Award Winner of Tooth and Claw



"This is a story about stories -- myths and legends and tavern tales, and the lies we tell ourselves in the silence of the night -- and the scary truths behind those stories. It's the story of Kvothe, a man who sought the truth of a legend and, in the process, became a legend himself. Kvothe himself is as vibrant and real a hero as you could want: brave and shy, wise and ignorant, humble and arrogant, sometimes all at the same time. THE NAME OF THE WIND is a tale told with warmth and sadness and quite a bit of humor, a Harry Potter for grownups. Come and meet Kvothe -- you'll be glad you did."
-David Levine,
Hugo Award Winner




 



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